Get that off my Goddamn bus (what would George Carlin say?)


Scepticism is a useful base from which to observe society’s trends. The trouble is, when you’re a regular consumer of blogs and podcasts on the subject (I like the flattering label of “science-based reason”), it’s difficult to blow away the natural bias that makes you think that your way of thinking is catching on.
If it is, and you believe the papers, then Britain’s fast becoming a nation of miserable geniuses.
So, if your sceptical nerves are ringing from seeing biblical quotes on the sides of buses, then cheer yourself up by pledging a fiver to a campaign to inject some atheist love into London’s clogged arteries.
If enough people chip in, then you could see the message “There’s probably no God. Now stop worrying and get on with your life” zipping around London.
What’s doubly amusing is the Guardian article referred to on the campaign page. In it, the reporter reveals that the aforementioned religious messages were accompanied by a website address which threatens unbelievers with spending “all eternity in torment in hell”.
As the recently deceased George Carlin said, “He will send you to a special place, of burning and fire and smoke and torture and anguish for you to live forever, and suffer and burn and scream until the end of time. But he loves you. He loves you and he needs money.”

Advertisements

0 Responses to “Get that off my Goddamn bus (what would George Carlin say?)”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Self-important bit

baby
I’m Victor Houghton, a, er... something or other in one of the UK’s largest advertising agencies. My job title has a comma in it, which is embarrassing. I’m the chief finder-things-outer with a splash of trends who is lucky to work with all the major functions of the agency, even though I am most closely associated with strategic planning. Everything in this blog has most probably been stolen from other, infinitely more talented people, although the opinions are most definitely my own and not those of the agency.

my del.icio.us

RSS

site stats

%d bloggers like this: